CIFST held its first Marvin Tung Student Case Competition at the 2022 Canadian Food Summit on Friday, June 3rd. The purpose of the competition is to provided emerging professionals with an opportunity to showcase their knowledge and skills as well as learn from each other through the analysis of a food sector case study. The primary objective of the case competition is to foster innovative thinking about a real-world problem while allowing students to hone their skills and network with their peers.

Congratulations to the 2022 Winners!

Team Cream of the Crop, Toronto Metropolitan University:

• Tina Farokhifar
• Aliza Hunt
• Iqra Masoom
• Stephanie Boissonneault

About Marvin Tung:

Dr. Marvin Tung passed away suddenly in November 1999 while attending a food engineering conference in Dallas, Texas. Marvin’s teaching and research specialities focussed on food material science, thermal processing and food packaging. Those of you who knew him will remember his quiet presence, unique mannerisms and playful use of words. Dr. Tung described himself as a student and a coach. He had an exceptional ability to adjust his language to the level of his audience, without being condescending. As a teacher, he was demanding but fair, and expected students to understand concepts rather than memorize facts. Marvin believed strongly in doing things to the best of one’s ability, and was quick to praise and acknowledge those who performed well (excerpted from FRI memoriam editorial, Britt, 2000).

About the case:

The case focussed on Sustainable Food Systems as defined by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations: “that delivers food security and nutrition for all in such a way that the economic, social and environmental bases to generate food security and nutrition for future generations are not compromised.”

The case focused on solutions for sustainable fresh vegetables and fruits for Canada’s north OR Urban food deserts.
Issues or questions to be addressed:

• Identify and describe the problem using peer-reviewed references, technical reports;
• Identify an innovative and novel solution to the problem;
• Elaborate on the workability and applicability of the solution and the benefits from the consumer/client level, to the local community, to society, the economy and environment.

First Round Semi-Finals:

Back in April, teams of full-time students enrolled in food science, food technology and nutrition programs across Canada participated in the semi-finals. Each team was required to submit a 3-5 page written case competition solution. The First Round submissions were judged by select industry professionals with four finalist teams announced on May 6th.

Second Round Finals:

The Second Round Finals took place on Friday, June 3rd and consisted of 4 teams presenting their First Round submission using a Powerpoint slide presentation to the judging panel and audience. Each team had 15 minutes to present followed by a short question period from the judging panel. The winning team, Cream of the Crop were announced at the conclusion of the Canadian Food Summit and were presented with the Marvin Tung trophy. The winning team also earned a cash prize. 

Further information about the Case:

Sustainable Food Systems, particularly as defined by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations: https://www.fao.org/3/ca2079en/CA2079EN.pdf

“A sustainable food system (SFS) is a food system that delivers food security and nutrition for all in such a way that the economic, social and environmental bases to generate food security and nutrition for future generations are not compromised.”

This means that: – It is profitable throughout (economic sustainability); – It has broad-based benefits for society (social sustainability); and – It has a positive or neutral impact on the natural environment (environmental sustainability). A sustainable food system lies at the heart of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Adopted in 2015, the SDGs call for major transformations in agriculture and food systems in order to end hunger, achieve food security and improve nutrition by 2030.

The Case focuses on Solutions for sustainable fresh vegetables and fruits for Canada’s north OR Urban food deserts.

Issues or questions to be addressed should include a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis, comprised of:

  1. Identify and describe the problem using peer-reviewed references, technical reports;
  2. Identify an innovative and novel solution to the problem;
  3. Elaborate on the workability and applicability of the solution and the benefits from the consumer/client level, to the local community, to society, the economy and environment.